FASHION AND LIFESTYLE is on Bredeemed

Description of Fashion and LifeStyle Goes here!!

Wall posts related to FASHION AND LIFESTYLE :

seun says "http://sunetfashion.blogspot.com.ng/2017/04/ankara-skirt-and-blouse.html"Details

kunleademola4 says "WOW...I'm finally in. Blessed be God of heaven"Details

damilolapopoola says "Study shows the way stress may harm your heart. Scientists said Thursday they may have uncovered a biological explanation for the long suspected link between stress and heart disease. People with a highly active amygdala — a region of the brain involved in stress processing — also have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, the researchers revealed. A hard-working amygdala was also linked to increased bone marrow activity and inflammation of the arteries, which may explain the higher heart disease and stroke risk, the team said. Features | Natural Health Study shows the way stress may harm your heart By AFP | 12 January 2017 | 11:37 am PHOTO:AFP PHOTO:AFP Scientists said Thursday they may have uncovered a biological explanation for the long suspected link between stress and heart disease. People with a highly active amygdala — a region of the brain involved in stress processing — also have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, the researchers revealed. A hard-working amygdala was also linked to increased bone marrow activity and inflammation of the arteries, which may explain the higher heart disease and stroke risk, the team said. The data suggested that stressed amygdala may send signals to the bone marrow to produce extra white blood cells, which may in turn cause arteries to narrow and become inflamed, causing cardiovascular problems. The potential link “raises the possibility that reducing stress could produce benefits that extend beyond an improved sense of psychological wellbeing,” said lead author Ahmed Tawakol of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Published in The Lancet medical journal, the study entailed PET and CT scans of the brain, bone marrow and spleen activity, as well as artery inflammation, of 293 patients. The group was surveyed for 3.7 years on average, during which time 22 suffered “cardiovascular events” — including heart attack, heart failure, stroke and narrowing of arteries, said the study. “Those with higher amygdala activity had a greater risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease and developed problems sooner than those with lower activity,” said the researchers. In a sub-study, 13 patients with a history of post-traumatic stress disorder were tested separately. “Those who reported the highest levels of stress had the highest levels of amygdala activity along with more signs of inflammation in their blood and the walls of their arteries,” the team found. The amygdala are almond-shaped neuron clusters deep in the brain thought to regulate emotion, fear, anxiety, pleasure and stress. Commenting on the study, Ilze Bot of Leiden University in the Netherlands said the data identified chronic stress “as a true risk factor” for cardiovascular diseases. Given the increasing number of people suffering from job or social stress, doctors may have to include it when they assess an individual’s risk for cardiovascular disease, she said. A 2014 study said chronic stress may trigger an overproduction of white blood cells which clump together on artery walls, restricting blood flow and encouraging clot-formation, to raise heart attack and stroke risk."Details

damilolapopoola says "Scientists near cure for blindness. Scientists plan to carry out clinical trials in humans with worsening vision, following ‘exciting’ research on mice to treat blindness. Mice, which had lost sight after suffering retinal degeneration, were able to detect light after having stem cell transplants. While researchers cautioned that restoring sight in people was some way off, they have proposed to move on to human trials after further animal testing. The mice in the study were transplanted with stem cells which had been grown into small patches of light-sensitive retina – the thin layer of tissue lining the back of the eye. The research, from the RIKEN institute in Japan, is said to be the first time photoreceptors – the light-sensitive neurons in the eye – have been successfully transplanted to host cells and sent visual signals to the host retina and brain. Dr. Michiko Mandai, who led the study, said: “Transplanting retinal tissue instead of simply using photoreceptor cells allowed the development of more mature, organised morphology, which likely led to better responses to light.” The study, published in Stem Cell Reports, showed mice who had implants were able to make associations with light, provided that a substantial amount of the transplant was located in the correct place. The authors said this showed the new cells in the retina not only responded to light but also that the information travelled to the brain and could be used to learn. Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Oxford, Robert MacLaren, said the research gave hope for people with poor sight. He said: “This study is exciting because it shows that a complicated part of the central nervous system, such as the retina, could potentially be regenerated from something as simple as a skin cell. Furthermore, the engineered retinal tissue appears to be able to make connections to the brain after transplantation. Clinical treatments are still a long way off but, for patients with retinal degeneration, this provides some hope for the future.” How does it work? The mice in the study were transplanted with stem cells which had been grown into small patches of light-sensitive retina – the thin layer of tissue lining the back of the eye. Dr. Michiko Mandai said: “Transplanting retinal tissue instead of simply using photoreceptor cells allowed the development of more mature, organiaed morphology, which likely led to better responses to light.” Mice who had implants were able to make associations with light, provided that a substantial amount of the transplant was located in the correct place. What is retinal degeneration? Retinal degenerative diseases all involve damage to photoreceptor cells of the retina, which malfunction and disappear. Photoreceptor cells are the light sensing cells of the retina, that lines the back of the eye. Normally, the retina’s photoreceptor cells sense light, initiating a cascade of electrical impulses that are sent through the retina and the optic nerve to the brain to create an image. When the photoreceptor cells malfunction due to the degenerative disease, the image that is received is blurred, distorted or completely unseen. This is often a progressive disease in which the person will suffer a continuous decline in vision."Details

damilolapopoola says "Exercise May Reduce Chance of Alzheimer's Disease Along with its many benefits to the body, studies reveal how exercise can support greater brain functioning as well. click to read http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/fitness/exercise-may-reduce-chance-of-alzheimers-disease/ar-AAkko3r?ocid=SK216DHP"Details

damilolapopoola says "5 easy moves to tone your body These low-impact exercises will lengthen and tone your body in no time! click to read more http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/fitness/5-easy-moves-to-tone-your-body/ar-BBxinOY?ocid=SK216DHP"Details

damilolapopoola says "8 Ways to Get an Early Morning Edge. Hone your mind, sculpt your body, increase your effectiveness, and improve your day all in an hour or less. click to read more http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/fitness/8-ways-to-get-an-early-morning-edge/ar-AAjUytl?ocid=SK216DHP"Details

seun says "http://sunetfashion.blogspot.com.ng"Details

damilolapopoola says "Signs That She’s the One. -You Actually Fight Instead of Holding Back Your Feelings While your last argument with her might leave you feeling crappy, one study reports that fights may be critical to keeping your relationship intact. Researchers from Florida State University found that expressing anger when disagreements arise may actually be necessary in resolving problems in the relationship. In fact, trying to just “forgive and forget” could lead to buried feelings of resentment that fester and almost always reappear later in the relationship."Details

damilolapopoola says "Signs That She’s the One. -You’re Both Positive Researchers from the University of Chicago found that when just one partner possesses a high level of positivity, there’s less conflict in the relationship. “Positive emotions are fundamental to any relationship because they counteract the negative emotions that shut us down,” says Jane Greer, New York-based relationship expert and author of What About Me? Stop Selfishness from Ruining Your Relationship. “This translates into feeling more secure with your partner and more trusting.” And the benefits of seeing the cup half full don’t stop there. Another study published in The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that couples who celebrated their partners’ achievements—say, a job promotion or killing that 7-minute mile—as if they were their own experienced greater satisfaction than those who reacted negatively or with indifference. In the study, the couples who had broken up rated their partners’ typical responses to good news as “particularly uninspiring.”"Details

More Posts >>>